5 Unique Benefits of Coffee: the useful with the agreeable

Coffee is a beloved beverage known for its ability to fine-tune your focus and boost your energy levels.

In fact, many people depend on their daily cup of joe right when they wake up to get their day started on the right foot.

In addition to its energizing effects, coffee has been linked to a long list of potential health benefits, giving you all the more reason to get brewing.

This article takes an in-depth look at 5 of the top evidence-based benefits of coffee.

1. Boosts energy levels


Coffee contains caffeine, a central nervous system stimulant that is known for its ability to fight fatigue and increase energy levels.

This is because caffeine blocks the receptors of a neurotransmitter called adenosine, and this increases levels of other neurotransmitters in your brain that regulate your energy levels, including dopamine.

One small study found that consuming caffeine increased time to exhaustion during a cycling exercise by 12% and significantly reduced subjective levels of fatigue in participants.

Another study had similar findings, reporting that consuming caffeine before and during a round of golf improved performance, increased subjective energy levels, and reduced feelings of fatigue

Coffee contains caffeine, a stimulant that has been shown to increase energy levels and decrease fatigue by altering levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain.

2. May be linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes


Some research suggests that consuming coffee regularly could be associated with a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes over the long term.

In fact, one review of 30 studies found that each cup of coffee people consumed per day was linked to a 6% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

This is thought to be due to coffee’s ability to preserve the function of the beta cells in your pancreas, which are responsible for producing insulin to regulate blood sugar levels.

Plus, it’s rich in antioxidants and may affect insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and metabolism — all of which are involved in the development of type 2 diabetes.

Regular coffee consumption may be linked to a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes over the long term.

3. Could support brain health


Although studies have turned up mixed results, some research suggests that coffee may help protect against certain neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.

According to one review of 13 studies, people who regularly consumed caffeine had a significantly lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. What’s more, caffeine consumption also slowed the progression of Parkinson’s disease over time.

Another review of 11 observational studies in more than 29,000 people also found that the more coffee people consumed, the lower their risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Additionally, several studies have demonstrated that moderate coffee consumption could be associated with a lower risk of dementia and cognitive decline.

Some research suggests that drinking coffee could help protect against Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and cognitive decline.

4. May promote weight management


According to some research, coffee could alter fat storage and support gut health, both of which may be beneficial for weight management.

For example, one review of 12 studies concluded that higher coffee consumption could be associated with decreased body fat, especially in men.

In another study, increased coffee intake was linked to decreased body fat in women.

Furthermore, one study found that people who drank one to two cups of coffee per day were 17% more likely to meet recommended physical activity levels, compared with those who drank less than one cup per day.

Higher levels of physical activity could help promote weight management.

Coffee could help support weight management and may be linked to decreased body fat. One study also found that people who consumed coffee were more likely to be physically active.

5. Linked to a lower risk of depression


Some studies have found that drinking coffee could be associated with a lower risk of depression.

According to one review of seven studies, each cup of coffee people consumed per day was linked to an 8% lower risk of depression.

Another study found that drinking at least four cups of coffee each day was associated with a significantly lower risk of depression, compared with drinking just one cup per day.

What’s more, one study in more than 200,000 people showed that drinking coffee was linked to a lower risk of death by suicide.

Several studies have found that coffee could be linked to a lower risk of depression and may even be linked to a lower risk of death by suicide.

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